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Towards 2024...

 

At Soggy Dog, we invite musicians and artists to embark on a captivating journey of musical expression. Ever wanted to know what happens? How do they prepare for their time in the studio? What lessons did they learn along the way? What do they wish they knew before? This blog is in it's beginnings, so bear with us, but please read on...

 

As always, we're having such a busy time heading towards the end of the year. There will be more client tales here soon, but first, here's details of a few noteworthy projects at the studio.

Left Write Hook

Seven women responded to a call-out to participate in an 8-week experimental recovery program. The program supports survivors of childhood sexual assault by addressing both the physical and emotional impacts of trauma through a unique combination of boxing and creative writing. What begins as an 8-week program soon becomes much more as these survivors build bonds with one another and with their coach that lead to transformations they could only have dreamed of.

Documentary out soon.

Bethany Whitmore

Australian Actor. Star of award-winning movies, such as Girl Asleep, and featured roles in The Family Law, and Picnic at Hanging Rock, is making her debut EP at the studio. Bethany, at the age of 23, is an experienced actor, performer, and writer.  She made her major debut at the age of seven in the multi award-winning feature, Mary and Max. Bethany, who played the young Mary, was joined with Eric Banner, Barry Humphries, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Toni Collette. Not a bad lot to be around in the movie world. 

Bethany's music is quirky, and artful. A collection of originals and original cover versions that show her creative depth.

AFL GRAND FINAL

Guess who's performing in the half-time entertainment? Peter 'Maz' Maslin, who is our main session drummer at the studio is also a member of Mark Seymour and The Undertow, and also of Boom Crash Opera. Maz is no stranger to big stadium crowds.

Harmonizing Passion and Precision:

An Inside Look at Crafting Music that Touches Hearts

Ayda Akbal has recently recorded with her band. The music sounded absolutely beautiful during the recording session, and I'm eagerly anticipating the release of this album. You can learn more about Ayda at her website, aydaakbal.com

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'Where Do I Belong? Here.' is an exploration of what it means (to her) to grow up as a first-generation Turkish-Australian. After a magical recording session, generously funded by the Angus Gray Piano Project Grant, Ayda is deeply excited to be releasing it into the world soon.​ She hopes it will connect with everyone in some way, no matter where they are from.


Describe the style or genre of music you're passionate about creating?

I'm passionate about creating music that touches you in the heart, fills you up, and is informed by many different genres. I'm specifically pursuing a career in screen music, but for my newest album, I'm exploring what it means to grow up a first-generation Turkish Australian in a jazz quintet, string quartet, and vocal setting. 

 

Which artists or albums have significantly influenced your music?

For my upcoming album, which I recorded at Soggy Dog Studios, I've been influenced by a variety of albums that I listened to growing up and also discovered throughout my own explorations. I was influenced by Coldplay's first few albums, specifically Viva La Vida and Prospekts March EP, Samora Pinderhughes' Grief, Bon Iver's 22, A Million, and Nico Muhly's Shrink: II. Sixths and Bill Laurence's Flint, to name a few!

What motivates you to record your music professionally?

My primary motivation for recording my music professionally is to be able to share it with people the way that I imagined it in my head. I'm truly fortunate to be able to afford something like this, but it's a really special experience to be capturing your music in precisely the way you imagined — and then be able to share that with other people. 

What role does your recording studio play in bringing your musical vision to life?

A studio space - of course - plays the key role in recording your music cleanly and professionally so that it can be mixed, mastered and released according to an artists' vision. 


In addition, a studio space has an important role in creating a safe and comfortable space, so the performers feel relaxed and there's nothing in their way of playing to the best of their ability. For me, ideally, the performers should also feel connected — not separated — which can be tricky when trying to isolate instruments and get clean audio recordings, but I really found that space in Soggy Dog Studios.

What advice would you give musicians considering recording their music professionally for the first time?

Be prepared for things to go wrong, and work beforehand to counteract that possibility. Whether in rehearsal, having chats, or planning for things taking extra time than expected. Do whatever you need to do to create an environment for yourself with the least stress so you can relax and enjoy playing the music - as that comes across in the recordings. 

 

Rob Tuncks, ABC Muster Dogs

"MUSTER DOGS" is a 4-part reality series about the important role of working dogs in Australian farming. It follows five farmers/trainers as they train puppies to become skilled working dogs, showcasing how this affects agriculture and the environment. Muster Dog was the ABC's highest-rating show for 2022.

Rob, featured on the show, has been recording his EP here. Not only is he a skilled farmer and a seriously good dog trainer, but he also has a long history of writing songs and performing. Although Rob owns his own recording studio and has always recorded his music in-house, this time he decided to collaborate. We gathered the best studio players for his genre and style and he has been working with them to bring his music to the level that he had always hoped. 

 

Fortunately, my studio has the word 'dog' in the name, so his choice of where to work was made easy. His EP should be ready for release in early 2024.

Pictured is Rob with our very own muster dog, Radar. 

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What advice would you give musicians considering recording their music professionally for the first time?

Be prepared for things to go wrong, and work beforehand to counteract that possibility. Whether in rehearsal, having chats, or planning for things taking extra time than expected. Do whatever you need to do to create an environment for yourself with the least stress so you can relax and enjoy playing the music - as that comes across in the recordings. 

 

Stephanie, Kim and friends from Melbourne's Zomi Burmese community.

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I have worked with some of Melbourne's Burmese community for around nine years. They have fled persecution in their country and as refugees and have found a home in Australia. I have loved every minute of working on several projects with these musicians. Typically, the backings are made in their homeland. We record vocals in the studio, edit, tune, and assemble the tracks ready for mixing.  The guide mix tracks and vocal stems tracks are then sent back to Burma for mixing.

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